October 20 card of the Week : 3 of Swords October 24 2014

By Carolyn Agis

This week’s tarot card, the Three of Swords reversed, speaks of grief and a connection to world pain. Merely seeing the card in this direction is enough to make one hesitate to move any further. After all, who wants to engage grief? Even writing or reading about it can become bittersweet. But the Three of Swords reminds us that sadness is ok. Grief can be right for this time.


The Three of Swords rules October 3 - 12. During this season the leaves are changing and mourning is in the air for things forgotten or lost. But the Three of Swords asks, “When can we see loss as change and not assign a value to it of good or bad?” The Three of Swords in all its maternal understanding recognizes the pain of the world, but advises us not to lose ourselves in these thoughts. When we give birth to something, be it a child or creative act, we must come to terms with its own mortality. By bringing life to someone or something, we inevitably bring it death as well, for that is the life-death cycle of this earth.


The Three of Swords is in air card, as all “sword” cards are. Air cards signify the mind and thought. Sometimes it is the thought of loss that affects us more greatly than the loss itself. Recognizing the coming of winter and the loss of the living we knew from summer can be more painful and entrapping than merely appreciating the change underfoot and knowing that like all things, pain-filled or joy-filled, they will pass. Take this Three of Swords like the great ring given to King Solomon. King Solomon had asked his ministers for what he presumed an impossible task, requesting a ring that “if a happy man looks at it, he becomes sad, and if a sad man looks at it, he becomes happy.” The ring thus presented to the King bore the engraving, “This too shall pass,” and King Solomon knew at once the medicine of the Three of Swords.


Let the Three of Swords bear witness to this passing for you, allowing you to take the time you need to not only understand the sadness that comes with life on earth, but the joy that soon replaces it.